Discussion:
Science Times 25th Anniversary
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maff
2003-11-11 10:29:26 UTC
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Science Times 25th Anniversary
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science/index.html

The first issue of Science Times appeared 25 years ago, on Nov. 14,
1978. Its guiding principle ever since has been that science is not a
collection of answers, but a way of asking questions, an enterprise
driven by curiosity. To celebrate the anniversary, we pose 25 of the
most provocative questions facing science. As always, answers are
provisional.
David Opstad
2003-11-11 15:45:04 UTC
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Post by maff
Science Times 25th Anniversary
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science/index.html
The first issue of Science Times appeared 25 years ago, on Nov. 14,
1978. Its guiding principle ever since has been that science is not a
collection of answers, but a way of asking questions, an enterprise
driven by curiosity. To celebrate the anniversary, we pose 25 of the
most provocative questions facing science. As always, answers are
provisional.
Hmmm, seems they missed one:

"Whatever happened to the number 7?"

(It appears to be missing from their list, which skips from 6 to 8)

Dave Opstad
a.a. #1747
Geoff Offermann
2003-11-11 17:39:06 UTC
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Post by David Opstad
Post by maff
Science Times 25th Anniversary
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science/index.html
The first issue of Science Times appeared 25 years ago, on Nov. 14,
1978. Its guiding principle ever since has been that science is not a
collection of answers, but a way of asking questions, an enterprise
driven by curiosity. To celebrate the anniversary, we pose 25 of the
most provocative questions facing science. As always, answers are
provisional.
"Whatever happened to the number 7?"
(It appears to be missing from their list, which skips from 6 to 8)
The No. 7 is further evidence of the liberal, Darwinist conspiracy
to keep the evolution-Creation controversy in the bag. But don't
tell anyone, 'kay?
maff
2003-11-11 21:57:10 UTC
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Post by David Opstad
Post by maff
Science Times 25th Anniversary
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science/index.html
INTERACTIVE FEATURE

7. What's replaceable?

ADVANCES IN MEDICAL SCIENCE
Post by David Opstad
Post by maff
The first issue of Science Times appeared 25 years ago, on Nov. 14,
1978. Its guiding principle ever since has been that science is not a
collection of answers, but a way of asking questions, an enterprise
driven by curiosity. To celebrate the anniversary, we pose 25 of the
most provocative questions facing science. As always, answers are
provisional.
"Whatever happened to the number 7?"
(It appears to be missing from their list, which skips from 6 to 8)
Dave Opstad
a.a. #1747
Marc Carter
2003-11-12 10:46:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by maff
Post by David Opstad
Post by maff
Science Times 25th Anniversary
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science/index.html
INTERACTIVE FEATURE
7. What's replaceable?
ADVANCES IN MEDICAL SCIENCE
Post by David Opstad
Post by maff
The first issue of Science Times appeared 25 years ago, on Nov. 14,
1978. Its guiding principle ever since has been that science is not a
collection of answers, but a way of asking questions, an enterprise
driven by curiosity. To celebrate the anniversary, we pose 25 of the
most provocative questions facing science. As always, answers are
provisional.
"Whatever happened to the number 7?"
(It appears to be missing from their list, which skips from 6 to 8)
Dave Opstad
a.a. #1747
Damn. Another good conspiracy theory shot to hell.
Daniel Harper
2003-11-13 03:34:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Opstad
Post by maff
Science Times 25th Anniversary
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science/index.html
The first issue of Science Times appeared 25 years ago, on Nov. 14,
1978. Its guiding principle ever since has been that science is not a
collection of answers, but a way of asking questions, an enterprise
driven by curiosity. To celebrate the anniversary, we pose 25 of the
most provocative questions facing science. As always, answers are
provisional.
"Whatever happened to the number 7?"
(It appears to be missing from their list, which skips from 6 to 8)
Dave Opstad
a.a. #1747
Six is the first perfect number. To have a seven on the list would be to
imply that there are things better than perfect, I.E. better than God.
Therefore, numbers higher than six cannot exist.

"Then why do you have eight and higher?"

No further questions.
--
...and it is my belief that no greater good has ever befallen you in this city
than my service to my God. [...] Wealth does not bring goodness, but goodness
brings wealth and every other blessing, both to the individual and that state.

Plato, quoting Socrates, from The _Apology_

--Daniel Harper

(Change terra to earth for email)
maff
2003-11-11 19:59:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by maff
Science Times 25th Anniversary
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science/index.html
The first issue of Science Times appeared 25 years ago, on Nov. 14,
1978. Its guiding principle ever since has been that science is not a
collection of answers, but a way of asking questions, an enterprise
driven by curiosity. To celebrate the anniversary, we pose 25 of the
most provocative questions facing science. As always, answers are
provisional.
Insert subject titles in Google news (http://news.google.com/ ) and
click on "Search News"

(1) Does Science Matter?

(2) Is War Our Biological Destiny?

(3) Will Humans Ever Visit Mars?

(4) How Does the Brain Work?

(5) What Is Gravity, Really?

(6) Will We Ever Find Atlantis?

(8) What Should We Eat?

(9) When Will the Next Ice Age Begin?

(10) What Happened Before the Big Bang?

(11) Could We Live Forever?

(12) Are Men Necessary? ...

... Are Women Necessary?

(13) What Is the Next Plague?

(14) Can Robots Become Conscious?

(15) Why Do We Sleep?

(16) Are Animals Smarter Than We Think?

(17) Can Science Prove the Existence of God?

(18) Is Evolution Truly Random?

(19) How Did Life Begin?

(20) Can Drugs Make Us Happier? Smarter?

(21) Should We Improve Our Genome?

(22) How Much Nature Is Enough?

(23) What Is the Most Important Problem in Math Today?

(24) Where Are Those Aliens?

(25) Do Paranormal Phenomena Exist?

Commentary: Rousing Science Out of the Lab and Into the Limelight

The Birth of Science Times: A Surprise, but No Accident

Personal Health: Trans Fats to Safe Sex: How Health Advice Has Changed

Essay: Spellbound by the Eternal Riddle, Scientists Revel in Their
Captivity

What Did We Learn From AIDS?

Voices: Scientists Look Ahead
maff
2003-11-16 11:50:07 UTC
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